June 11, 2014

ADA Advocating for Poorer Food in Schools

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is putting words in my mouth and they are very sour. In an email I received today, June 10, 2014, from Tekisha D. Everette, PhD, Managing Director, Federal Government Affairs, American Diabetes Association, I was told, “As a Diabetes Advocate, you led the fight to ensure America’s children have access to healthy school food. Because of you, Congress passed legislation in 2010 making school breakfasts and lunches healthier. Next year, snacks and drinks served in school will be as well.”

Apparently, they don't know me at all. I would never advocate for the food the USDA says must be served in school lunch menus. High carbohydrate - low fat is not my idea and for many students they are protesting as well. Limiting the total calorie count to 850 calories is not good for growing adolescents. In addition, the USDA is pushing low sodium (not salt) which a growing body needs. And the USDA is promoting whole grains to be served with every lunch.

Then the email continues - But now, the House of Representatives is poised to roll back these important new nutrition standards. We cannot allow this to happen!”

Well, ADA, I have written my representative advising him that I will vote against him if the bill does not get passed and USDA taken out of the equation. The school lunch program has been ruined for many children and they are complaining about being hungry.

Is it any wonder that the fast food establishments are the first stop for many children when they leave school? The more meat they can get the better they feel. Most are left completely unsatisfied by the manufactured meats they receive in sandwiches they are served as part of the school lunch program.

The USDA high carb/low fat will not reduce the obesity epidemic threatening our children and this will add to the diabetes numbers ADA says we must prevent by supporting the USDA nutrition guidelines for our schools.

For those that agree with me or need more reading, three blogs by Tom Naughton should help. Blog 1, blog2, and blog 3 are just a few of his against the current USDA policy of the poor food supplied out children.

1 comment:

Denise Elliott said...

In addition to the low fat, low protein guidelines, the reliance on packaged, processed foods, many of which are packed with added sugar, is disturbing. If anyone wants to help kids feel better and learn to maintain a healthy weight, limiting added sugar in their food would be a great place to start!